Bernice “Bee” Haydu

Bernice “Bee” Falk Haydu

W.A.S.P. Women’s Airforce Service Pilot, WWII

Artwork and Research is by;

Sir Ernie Hamilton Boyette

On the left is Bee soon after becoming a pilot. On the right is Bee today, active with WASP activities.

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Here is Bee dismounting a PT-17 she just landed.

82 PT-17 2011

This is the print of Bee’s PT-17 published in May 2011.

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Print Price $65.00      Shipping $6.00 any where in the world.

Limited Edition Prints are signed and numbered by the artist and autographed in graphite pencil by Bernice Haydu.

There were only 350 Limited Edition prints published in this series.

Poster Prints are only $14.95.

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Poster Prints are not autographed. There were only 400 Poster Prints Published.

AT-6 Trainer

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Here is Bee and an AT-6 Texan at Avenger Field, Sweetwater, Texas.

Below is a poster print that has been autographed by Bee. This is one of the AT-6 trainers she flew.

71 AT-6 2009

150 poster prints were autographed by WASP pilot Bernice Haydu. Print Size 12

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Print Price $40.00 Shipping $6.00 anywhere in the world.

Twenty prints were also autographed by WASP pilot Betty Blake.

I met Betty at a function with Bee Haydu. Betty was kind enough to autograph some of the AT-6 prints for me.

Betty told me that she probably flew this AT-6 as well as Bee.

Betty spent many hours in the AT-6 and loved the power of the aircraft.

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Poster price autographed by WASP pilot, Betty Blake. $40.00

750 Poster Prints were published in this series. No Limited Editions were in the publication of the print. These are posters only. Posters are not autographed.

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Poster print price only. $14.95   Shipping $6.00 anywhere in the world.

Bernice “Bee” Falk Haydu

Early in 1941 the famous woman air racer, Jackie Cochran approached General Henry “Hap” Arnold about the development of a training program for women in the military Air Corps. The formation of a group of Army Air Corps Women pilots soon began. At his suggestion Jackie recruited 24 experienced pilots to serve with the ATA (Air Transport Auxiliary) program in England under an 18 month contract. This consisted of civilian men and women.

Jackie was invited to meet with the President and his wife, Eleanor Roosevelt. At the luncheon Jackie approached Mrs. Roosevelt with the idea of training women in military aircraft. Mrs. Roosevelt was a major supporter of this idea. She was also instrumental in recognizing the Tuskegee Airmen.

Another noted woman pilot, Nancy Love, was approached by the Air Transport Command to form a ferrying service using experienced women pilots without the need for military training. The recruits were notified to report to Wilmington, Delaware (New Castle Army Air Base) September, 1942. By October, 1942 they had a total of 28 women known as WAFS (Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron).

Jackie Cochran returned from England in September, 1942. At that time General “Hap” Arnold gave her authority to open Women’s Flying Training Detachment in Houston, Texas in November, 1942. In April, 1943 the training base was moved to Avenger Field, Sweetwater, Texas. Because the program was experimental the trainees were Civil Service Employees rather than members of the Army Air Corp. The women were given the same training as the male cadets.

In August, 1943 both the WAFS and WFTD were joined to become the Women Airforce Service Pilots. Jackie Cochran was in command of the entire WASP program and Nancy Love was in command of the women pilots who flew in the ferrying command which included WAFS and some graduate WASP. The duties of the WASP expanded to fly for the Training Command performing all stateside duties.

The Women’s Airforce Service Pilot program was disbanded before they officially became military personnel. The total miles flown by the women pilots was 60,000,000 delivering 12,652 aircraft from single engine to four-engine B-17’s and B-24’s. They exceeded all expectations and flew every aircraft manufactured for WWII from the smallest to the largest, including the B-29 and all pursuits. One thousand one hundred and two women successfully served as WASP. Some of them were permanently injured and thirty-eight lost their lives in the line of duty. The program was deactivated on December 20, 1944. The WASP served with distinction and it wasn’t until November, 1977 when President Carter signed the bill recognized the WASP as veterans of WWII.

The AT-6 trainer was a proven favorite with the women pilots. The aircraft illustrated above was from Avenger Field, Sweetwater, Texas. Many thousands of hours were spent in this dependable aircraft.

Bee Haydu was in the Oval Office in Washington D. C. on July 1, 2009 for the signing of the WASP Congressional Gold Medal bill by President Obama. Finally the WASP have been properly recognized for their efforts.

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WASP pilot Bernice Falk Haydu pulls back the chair of President Barack Obama after signing S.614, a bill to award a Congressional Gold Medal to the Women Airforce Service Pilots, in the Oval Office Wednesday, July 1, 2009. At far left is WASP pilot Elaine Danforth Harmon, and at right is Lorraine H. Rodgers. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.) is at right in green. Current US Air Force pilots are in the background. Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) was established during World War II, and from 1942 to 1943, more than a thousand women joined, flying sixty million miles of non-combat military missions. Of the women who received their wings as Women Airforce Service Pilots, approximately 300 are living today. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

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President Barack Obama with WASP pilots Elaine Danforth Harmon, left, Bernice Falk Haydu and Lorraine H. Rodgers, right, after signing S.614, a bill to award a Congressional Gold Medal to the Women Airforce Service Pilots, in the Oval Office Wednesday, July 1, 2009. Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) was established during World War II, and from 1942 to 1943, more than a thousand women joined, flying sixty million miles of non-combat military missions. Of the women who received their wings as Women Airforce Service Pilots, approximately 300 are living today. Also pictured are active duty US Air Force pilots and Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.) (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

photo_Whitehouse_3

President Barack Obama signs S.614, a bill to award a Congressional Gold Medal to the Women Airforce Service Pilots, in the Oval Office Wednesday, July 1, 2009. Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) was established during World War II, and from 1942 to 1943, more than a thousand women joined, flying sixty million miles of non-combat military missions. Of the women who received their wings as Women Airforce Service Pilots, approximately 300 are living today. Flanking the President are Bernice Falk Haydu, far left, Elaine Danforth Harmon, and Lorraine H. Rodgers, right. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.) is at far right. Behind the President are active duty US Air Force pilots. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Historical Research and text by Bernice Falk Haydu and Sir Hamilton. Artwork by Sir Ernie Hamilton Boyette.painting_PT-17_Bee_web

This is my original painting of the above PT-17 that Bee flew. Price $2,500.00

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This painting is 2×3 feet and has been autographed by WASP pilot Bee Haydu.

A.P._AT-6_A_Painting

This is my original painting of the AT-6. $3,500.00

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This painting is 2×4 feet and has been autographed by seven WASP pilots including Bee Haydu.